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Immigration FAQ

Immigration FAQ

Our Experienced Immigration Attorney Can Answer Your Questions

There is no doubt that immigration laws in the United States are complex and confusing. With policies constantly changing in today’s political climate, it can be difficult to know the options and requirements for immigration matters. The following are some frequently asked questions about immigration cases. To discuss your specific situation, please contact the immigration lawyers at Miranda, Magden & Miranda, LLP directly.  

There are different non-immigrant visas available for people who only wish to stay in the U.S. for a temporary period of time. Some of these include student visas for educational programs, tourist visas, employer-sponsored visas for a variety of workers, investor visas, and more. Each type of temporary visa has its own procedures, requirements, and restrictions. It is important to follow the right process to obtain the proper visa for your situation.

If you receive a non-immigrant or permanent visa, your spouse and children younger than 21 are often eligible to obtain visas to accompany you to the United States. If you are a U.S. citizen or Legal Permanent Resident with family members in foreign countries, there are family-based immigration options that can often allow you to sponsor certain close family members for visas.

If you have certain types of visas and/or qualifying relationships, you might be eligible to apply for an adjustment of status to lawful permanent resident (LPR) and to receive a green card. The application and interview process can be complex, and you do not want to risk unnecessary complications or delays. Always discuss a possible green card application with an immigration attorney before you start the process. Once you obtain a green card, it can be valid for up to ten years before you must renew it. If your family member is outside the United States, applying for a green card is called consular processing.

Many people start the immigration process with the goal of eventually becoming a United States citizen. This can be a lengthy process, though citizenship brings many rights, including the inability to be deported. Some requirements to be approved for naturalization include:

  • You must be 18 years old or older
  • You have had a green card for at least five years (or 3 years if your green card was based on your marriage to  your U.S. Citizen spouse and you are still together)
  • You have held a residence in the U.S. continuously for at least five years, and you were physically in the U.S. for at least 30 months of that five-year period
  • You have good moral character and no convictions for crimes of moral turpitude
  • You can demonstrate the ability to speak, read, and write basic English
  • You can pass an exam about basic U.S. government and history

Consult with Our Knowledgeable Immigration Attorneys about Your Concerns Today

The answers to immigration questions will vary depending on your circumstances, so you should consult directly with our legal team at Miranda, Magden & Miranda, LLP if you have questions about a possible case. Contact us for more information. 

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